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Mental Health

THIRA Health / Mental Health

The NAMI National Convention

On June 21st, 2019 NAMI held their National Convention in Seattle. The convention provided the community an opportunity for education, connection, and access to resources. This annual event supports individuals living with mental illness and their loved ones. What is NAMI? NAMI stands for the National Alliance on Mental Illness and is our nation’s largest grassroots mental health organization. NAMI also has more than 500 affiliates that work in local communities to help provide support and education on mental illness. Their goal is to educate, advocate, listen, and lead in fighting stigma and encourage understanding of the importance of mental health. What does NAMI do for you? NAMI has a plethora of knowledge and tools to help anyone and everyone who is affected by mental illness. Their website features pages such as, “Know the Warning Signs”, which gives...

The Power of Women-Centered Treatment Groups

Prior to the 1970s, there was little recognition of the specific, separate needs of women and men in mental health treatment. The troubles and anxieties of both genders had been often grouped together in the development of mental health care models for most of the 20th century—regardless of inequalities in economic and social life, hormonal fluctuations, and the various (and significant) differences between how each sex experienced depression. Over the decades that followed the Women’s Movement of the ‘70s, greater recognition emerged for the variables influencing the treatment for men and women, and distinct tracks began to form for women seeking gender-specific support. Our founder, Dr. Merhi Moore, started THIRA to offer intensive, focused, and individualized mental health treatment for women and girls grappling with anxiety and...

5 Tips For Improving Bad Habits

Our habits, over time, build up the experiences that define our lifestyle and the way we approach life. A habit can be physical and health-related, such as eating fatty foods and sweets or smoking cigarettes, or it can be emotional and mental - such as the re-telling of a personal narrative that causes us stress. Habits are patterns of behavior that often happen outside of our awareness. While you may be most aware of the habits that work against you, what matters most is taking action for change. It is crucial to understand that ineffective habits don’t go away on their own. Unfortunately, breaking a bad habit can be quite daunting for people, and there’s deep-seeded behavioral reasoning for this. We’re hard-wired to re-create experiences that...

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5 Benefits of a Social Media Detox

The original intent of social media sites such as MySpace or Facebook was to create an online platform in which people could connect. This concept took advantage of the far reaching potential of the internet and sought to do something positive and simple -- bring people together. No one can argue that social media has not achieved this goal. It is hard to imagine that virtual networking could come with so many negative side effects, but it does, and consumers feel the impact of them each and every day whether they realize it or not. Taking a step back from sites like Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram can feel like you’re folding in the middle of a very exciting game. Social media has no off season,...

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Daylight Savings Brings Shorter Days – Here’s How To Cope with Seasonal Affective Disorder

As the days get shorter and temperatures drop, it’s easy to get tired of the darkness and colder weather. It’s entirely possible that your mood can be affected too - afterall, we all rely on sunlight and Vitamin D to maintain high levels of energy and positivity. For people who struggle with Seasonal Affective Disorder getting through the colder months can be especially difficult. According to the National Institute of Mental Health, Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) is a type of depression that relates to changes in seasons. Its onset happens in the fall or early winter, and ends around springtime, with possible symptoms including fatigue, moodiness and disorganized sleeping patterns. Those people who are prone to depression are especially at risk for SAD. As such, the team...

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15 Apps to Start Your Self-Help Journey

In light of Mental Health Awareness month, the team at THIRA would like to provide you with all possible resources to help cope with mental health challenges. Such resources can come in many forms, such as individual therapy sessions, support groups, and even health and wellness programs. However, we understand that in-person therapy (and therapy as a whole) may not be an option for everyone. In today’s digital world finding resources and answers for mental health challenges has become easier - as has to take that first step towards getting help. In light of this, we would like to recommend a few apps to help you get started on your self-help journey, improve your daily routines and practice DBT-based mindfulness skills in the comfort of your...

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Empty Nest Syndrome

It’s that time of the year: high school students making their college decisions, moving out and starting their independent lives away from home. Many parents may start to experience the Empty Nest Syndrome - that feeling of sadness and loss when their children grow and up and “leave the nest.” Despite the name, Empty Nest Syndrome is not a diagnosis and does not require clinical treatment. It is simply a name that characterizes what so many parents experience at this point in their lives. Empty Nest syndrome may occur in both males and females, although it’s most common among full-time parents, parents who have difficulty dealing with separation and change, parents who are also dealing with a change or their own, and finally, those who...

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Understanding Hunger: Decoding Important Messages from your Body

By Emily Fitch, Resident Dietician    Food is among the greatest, simplest pleasures of being human. Every piece of food we digest offers our bodies something different, and personally understanding our relationship to food is the first step in building health and mental well-being. For example, upon tasting something naturally delicious—like an apple—the human tongue sends immediate sensory reward signals to the brain, and within 15 minutes the apple’s carbohydrates are converted to blood glucose that gives our body a burst of energy and endorphins. Apples are rich in a variety of phytonutrients (plant chemicals), and studies have linked the consumption of apples with reduced risk of cardiovascular disease, asthma, diabetes, and some forms of cancers. Food is a fundamental fuel for our personal and collective mind,...

How to Spot a Fad Diet — A Few Red Flags to Watch For

The characteristics of a fad diet are built around the intense, contagious enthusiasm for a niche weight-loss strategy, and the general promise of a faster and easier pathway to results. These crazes seem to emerge without scientific credibility or precedent, and are most often accompanied by the toned abdomen of a popular, fast-talking swami. Unfortunately and predictably, the individuals who are most easily victimized by the false pretenses of a fad diet are those concerned with so dramatically altering their physical appearance that they resemble another person—and to make matters worse, they want a shortcut for doing so. The language of dieting diversions is meant to exacerbate these feelings of insecurity and inaction, and to prey upon the confusion felt by an unsupported individual in need...

Healthy Brain Checklist: Different Ways to Feed Your Mind

Despite the fact that the hardest working part of the body is the brain, one is far more likely to hear commentary about nourishing only the visible parts of the body. Informed with new research, it’s clear that what we put into our guts—personally and collectively—has more influence on our brainpower and social wellness than previously thought possible. And while it’s admittedly harder to observe the gains of a well-fed brain than it is to appreciate the physical earmarks of time spent in the gym, nutrition is the key to getting the most from our work, our work-outs, and our brains in general. Here are four simple habits for building your brain up each day, and a friendly reminder that you’re a mental and physical by-product...

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